The Jam Factory II
Green Walk, London SE1

£1,795,000
Leasehold

Architect: Simpson Haugh

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"This particular property is one of the largest in the development and occupies a quiet corner with no through-route, resulting in enhanced privacy."

This excellent four-bedroom maisonette can be found in The Jam Factory, one of the most outstanding industrial conversions to be completed in London in recent years. Originally dating from 1902 when it was constructed as a factory for Sir William Hartley’s famous jam-making company, the building was converted in 2003 to a design by Simpson Haugh architects.

This particular property is one of the largest in the development and occupies a quiet corner with no through-route, resulting in enhanced privacy. Internal accommodation exceeds 2,000 sq ft and is arranged over the raised-ground and lower-ground floors.

Entry is via steel steps to the upper level, an expansive lateral space with engineered-oak flooring, containing a living room, dining room, kitchen, and utility room with separate WC. South-facing glazed double doors with high, arched transom windows punctuate the exposed-brick walls and flood the space with light.

There four double bedrooms, one situated on a split level and currently used as a studio. The master bedroom has a large walk-in wardrobe and en-suite shower room with walk-in shower. Also on this level is a separate family bathroom. Underfloor heating extends throughout.

The development is gated with a 24-hour porter, and communal gardens with an excellent children’s playground. There are residents’ parking spaces along the nearby street or parking spaces to rent separately in an underground car park within the development.

The Jam Factory is located around four minutes’ walk to Bermondsey Street, home to a large number of independent restaurants and bars, and the White Cube gallery. It is also popular with independent design practices, many of which choose to base their offices in this vibrant area. Borough market is nearby, and the South Bank, Tate Modern and the river are within easy walking distance.

Borough Underground station (Northern Line) is around eight minutes’ walk and both London Bridge (Jubilee, Northern and National Rail) and Elephant and Castle (Bakerloo) stations and are within easy reach.

Tenure: Leasehold
Lease Length: approx. 980 years
Service charge: approx. £7,400 per annum
Ground Rent: approx. £150 per annum

Please note that all areas, measurements and distances given in these particulars are approximate and rounded. The text, photographs and floor plans are for general guidance only. The Modern House has not tested any services, appliances or specific fittings — prospective purchasers are advised to inspect the property themselves. All fixtures, fittings and furniture not specifically itemised within these particulars are deemed removable by the vendor.


History

Built between 1899 and 1901, by Sir William Pickles Hartley, the founder of Hartley’s, The Jam Factory signified the expansion of the Hartley’s brand from its origins in Lancashire to the country-wide market. It occupied the site of a former tannery in Bermondsey, known at the time as ‘London’s Larder’ for its food production and trade up to and along the river.

At the opening of the factory, William Hartley told reporters “Hartley’s makes only one quality – the best.” Within a few years Hartley’s was the country’s biggest jam producer and further blocks were added to the building in 1908 and 1913.

Production at the factory ended in 1962 and it became a distribution depot before closing in 1975. The building stood empty until 1999 when a new lease of life was breathed into it by Simpson Haugh Architects.

Work completed on the Jam Factory conversion in 2003. The existing buildings were sensitively adapted, preserving the heritage value while creating a combination of generous and flexible apartments, live/work units and spaces for leisure and commercial uses. The only significant contemporary intervention was the addition of lightweight glazed penthouses that are set-back from the existing façade.

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