Barrowgate Road
London W4

£1,475,000
Freehold

Architect: John Morton

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"The house was formerly the home of architect and designer John Morton, one half of Lupton Morton, a leading manufacturer of modern furniture in the 1950s and 60s responsible for the popular Campus range, and an innovator in shared workspaces."

This wonderfully engaging three-bedroom house, with private garden and off-street parking, is located on sought-after Barrowgate Road, a quiet tree-lined avenue between the open spaces of Chiswick House and Gardens and Turnham Green. Once part of a larger Victorian property, it was converted in the late 1980s by celebrated architect and designer John Morton for the use of his family.

The house is accessed through a front garden with off-street parking and a side entrance via a shared walkway. The ground floor is arranged in an open plan with living space and kitchen divided by a central dining area. Light pours in from windows at both aspects and through timber-framed Velux in the kitchen. A glazed door at the rear provides a route to a lovely, paved garden, which can also be accessed via the external walkway. Also on this level is a utility room with guest WC, and access to a large basement with unusually high ceilings.

An expansive master bedroom, with built-in wardrobes and en-suite bathroom, occupies the first floor, with two further bedrooms on the upper level. There is plenty of storage throughout the house, particularly in the substantial eaves of the second floor, with further loft space above.

The house was formerly the home of architect and designer John Morton, one half of Lupton Morton, a leading manufacturer of modern furniture in the 1950s and 60s responsible for the popular Campus range, and an innovator in shared workspaces. A long-time and well-known resident of Chiswick, Morton collaborated with the architect David Rock and office space expert John Townsend in converting the nearby empty Sanderson wallpaper factory into around 70 individual workspaces for craftspeople, architects and designers, who shared administrative staff, facilities and costs. Known as Barley Mow workspace, it opened in 1976 and continues today, setting the standard for many similar projects, and for which Morton was awarded an MBE.

Barrowgate Road is located a short walk away from the green spaces of Chiswick House and Gardens, arguably the finest remaining example of Neo-Palladian architecture in London, designed by Lord Burlington and completed in 1729. In its grounds is also an excellent cafe built in 2010 to a design by Caruso St John Architects.

Chiswick High Road and Turnham Green Terrace are both a short walk away, and are lined with excellent parades of independent shops, restaurants and cafés, including Chief Coffee and High Road House (Soho House group).

The nearest station is Chiswick Park (District Line) which is approximately eight minutes’ walk, and Turnham Green station (District and Piccadilly Line) is also close by. Heathrow Airport and the M25 are approximately 20 minutes by car.

Please note that all areas, measurements and distances given in these particulars are approximate and rounded. The text, photographs and floor plans are for general guidance only. The Modern House has not tested any services, appliances or specific fittings — prospective purchasers are advised to inspect the property themselves. All fixtures, fittings and furniture not specifically itemised within these particulars are deemed removable by the vendor.


History

John Morton MBE (1919 – 2017) was co-founder of Lupton Morton, a visionary manufacturer of flat-pack modern furniture in the 1950s and 60s best known for their Campus furniture range.

Morton began studies at the Architectural Association in London after the Second World War and it was here that he met Lupton. During a 1947 trip to Scandinavia, Morton was struck by the sophistication of modern furniture that was available and affordable to everyone. After his studies, he assisted the architects Robert Goodden and RD Russell on the Lion and Unicorn Pavilion for the Festival of Britain, an ambitious national exhibition designed to celebrate and promote British science, technology, industrial design, architecture and the arts in the wake of the Second World War.

In the early 1960s, universities were rapidly expanding and Morton grasped their potential as a market. He set up the Living and Learning exhibition, touring towns where new universities were planned and it was from this that Campus furniture was born. By 1967, 18 universities had purchased Campus’ flat pack self-assembly furniture.

Campus used beech frames, sometimes sprayed dark green, red or white and assembled with Allen keys. All of the furniture came in a range of tactile fabrics in fashionable 60s colours such, jade green, burnt orange, and rust.

In 1969 the company was acquired by Ryman Conran, the brief partnership of Ryman stationery and Terence Conran and the Campus range was on sale at Habitat until the late 70s. Meanwhile, Morton collaborated with the architect David Rock and office space expert John Townsend to convert an empty factory into around 70 individual workspaces for craftspeople, architects and designers, who shared administrative staff, facilities and costs. This visionary development set the standard for many shared workspaces, and Barley Mow continues today.


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