Architect: Walter Segal

Segal Close
London SE23

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A four-bedroom detached house with an attractive garden and outdoor terrace with views on a peaceful cul-de-sac.  Built in the early 1980s, this timber-framed, architect-designed house was built using the ‘Segal Method’, a system of design and construction pioneered by the celebrated Swiss architect Walter Segal (for more information on the architect, please visit the History section).

The house has been well maintained by the current owners and was fitted with a new roof covering and further insulation approximately three yours ago. Double-glazing and gas central heating can also be found throughout the property. Much of the flooring is parquet. A new oak-detailed kitchen has also been recently installed. The property benefits from a parking space in a private car park on Segal Close.

Segal Close is a short cul-de-sac that consists of seven ‘Segal Method’ houses. It is a 10 – 15 minute walk from Honor Oak Park railway station, which runs regular fast services into London Bridge station (journey time: 12 minutes). It is also part of the London Overground system and East London line which takes you into Canary Wharf or East London (e.g. Shoreditch). Shopping and dining opportunities are available in nearby East Dulwich, Honor Oak, Forest Hill and Brockley. Blythe Hill Fields, a large park area, is a five-minute walk away. Forest Hill, with the Horniman Musuem, is also close by, as is Dulwich Village.

Please note that all areas, measurements and distances given in these particulars are approximate and rounded. The text, photographs and floor plans are for general guidance only. The Modern House has not tested any services, appliances or specific fittings — prospective purchasers are advised to inspect the property themselves. All fixtures, fittings and furniture not specifically itemised within these particulars are deemed removable by the vendor.


History

Walter Segal was a visionary architect who was born in Switzerland but spent most of his working life in the UK. One of the most fascinating figures of late 20th-century architecture, he was a Modernist who maintained an interest in traditional building techniques.

Segal trained in Berlin, a city that was at the forefront of Modernism in architecture, and moved to London in 1936. It wasn’t until the 1960s, however, that Segal began to gain recognition for his ideas and methods. Today, Segal’s reputation continues to rise – not least because of his environmentally friendly approach to building.

The so-called ‘Segal Method’ was a way of constructing houses that eliminated the need for various processes such as a brick-laying, cement-pouring and other techniques that Segal considered superfluous to the construction of a good house. Instead, he advocated a modular, timber-frame system that is reminiscent of 19th-century American houses or traditional Japanese architecture. For more information on the Segal Method please click here.

Segal himself was much influenced by the egalitarian principles of William Morris, as well as the early Modernists. “The buildings of the International Style”, wrote Segal, “ were by definition unassuming… They were meant to promote wellbeing”. Segal was also inspired by traditional building principles, particularly those of Japan. Colin Ward, in an essay on Segal, noted,  “in his life, as well as his work, he tried to pare away the superfluous and concentrate on the important”.


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Walter Segal

Walter Segal (1907-1985) was a Swiss-born architect who devised a system of self-build housing. The “Segal Method” eliminates the need for wet trades such as bricklaying and plastering, using a modular, timber-frame system that allows for ease of construction and low maintenance. The roofs tend to be flat, with many layers of roofing felt, and foundations are minimal, the strength coming from the geometry of their construction. Walter Segal trained in Berlin, a city that was at the forefront of Modernism in architecture, and moved to London in 1936. It wasn’t until the 1960s, however, that he began to gain recognition for his ideas and methods. Today, his reputation continues to rise, not least because of his environmentally friendly approach to building. Segal himself was much influenced by the egalitarian principles of William Morris, as well as the early Modernists.

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